Posted by: emilywil | February 2, 2009

Chapter 2:Evolution of PR…Who Knew?

 Edward Bernays Campaign For Cigarettes included the “Torches of Freedom”

  

           In PR class today we focused on how far PR has come since the very beginnings, tracing all the way back to the Rosetta Stone, which is thought to be a publicity release for the pharaoh.  Today I learned a lot about the pioneers of PR, especially Edward L. Bernays, whom is refereed to as the “Father of Modern Public Relations.”  His campagins for corporations such as Ivory Soap were very impressive to me, especially how he thought of the idea of thesoap sculpture contest for school-aged children.  This idea boosted the sales of Ivory Soap by forming a generation of children that grew up very familiar with the soap. Also, above is a picture of another one of his campaigns from “Torches-of-Freedom” where he advocated women smoking cigarettes in the 1920’s. 

    I was very surprised to learn how far back PR started, for example when Pope Gregory XV was supposedly the first to use propaganda.    I was also surprised to see how long it took for people to start using press releases and press conferences to advocate their companies.  I was shocked to find out that Teddy Roosevelt was the first president to use news conferences and press  releases to get public support.  I thought someone would have discovered that long before Roosevelt. 

   In the pioneers section of the book, there was little biographies on some of the main PR pioneers, however there was not anything on sports PR.  I would love to learn more about the famous pioneers of sports PR, because those are the people I would like to research and follow after.  Also, I’m glad that we learned that in the next fifty years PR people need to start focusing more on multi-race and elderly people.  Knowing this now, I can start to brainstorm at a young age how to accomplish appealing to these groups of people.

*All this information was taken from Public Relations: Strategies and Tactics: 9th Ed.

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